08
Heather

Calluna vulgaris

The Latin Calluna is derived from the Greek kallunein meaning “to beautify, to sweep clean” and refers to the tradition of making besoms from heather twigs. Like Bog Myrtle, Heather was a traditional additive to gruit ale and the 18th century naturalist Thomas Pennant observed in his 1769 work A Tour of Scotland, that on Islay: “ale is frequently made of the young tops of heath, mixing two thirds of that plant with one of malt”. Heather ale was a favourite of the early Picts and traces of a fermented drink made of heather flowers have been found on a 3,000-year-old shard of pottery from the Isle of Rum.

Traditionally an emblem of Scotland itself, Robbie Burns frequently refers to the plant: “We’ll sing auld Coila’s plains and fells, Her moors red-brown wi’ heather bells”. So much did Queen Victoria love Scotland that a sprig of heather featured in the wedding bouquet given to her by Prince Albert. The rarer white heather is said to only grow on the graves of faeries and this is the source of the property of good luck long associated with heather in general.

Heather

Discover the 22 Botanicals

apple mint

01

Apple mint

chamomile

02

Chamomile

Creeping thistle flower used in the botanist gin

03

Creeping thistle

Downy Birch

04

Downy Birch

Elder flower

05

Elder

Gorse

06

Gorse (Whin)

Hawthorn

07

Hawthorn

Heather

08

Heather

Juniper

09

Juniper

lady's bedstraw

10

Lady’s bedstraw

Lemon Balm

11

Lemon Balm

meadowsweet

12

Meadowsweet

Mugwort

13

Mugwort

Red clover

14

Red clover

Spear mint

15

Spear mint

Sweet cicely

16

Sweet cicely

Bog Myrtle (Sweet Gale)

17

Bog myrtle – Sweet gale

Tansy

18

Tansy

water mint

19

Water mint

White Clover

20

White clover

Wild thyme

21

Wild Thyme

wood sage

22

Wood sage

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