20
White Clover

Trifolium repens

To the Celts, white clover was a sacred, magical plant and the Druids saw its three leaves as symbols of earth, sea and sky.  The Anglo-Saxons called it  “cloeferwort” indicating a plant of medicinal virtue.  While its historical use in herbal medicine as a cure for everything from whooping cough to bronchitis and gout has slipped away in favour of infusions taken from its red relative, white clover is now known all over the world for its ability to improve pasture.

People have long appreciated the value of white clover in grazing, long before they understood its ability to fertilize the land.  Writing for the Highland Society in 1807 during his exploration of ‘Native Plants Most Deserving of Culture in Scotland’, the Rev. William Singers avows that it is ‘the delight of sheep, cattle and horses’.

White Clover - Trifolium repens

Discover the 22 Botanicals

apple mint

01

Apple mint

chamomile

02

Chamomile

Creeping thistle flower used in the botanist gin

03

Creeping thistle

Downy Birch

04

Downy Birch

Elder flower

05

Elder

Gorse

06

Gorse (Whin)

Hawthorn

07

Hawthorn

Heather

08

Heather

Juniper

09

Juniper

lady's bedstraw

10

Lady’s bedstraw

Lemon Balm

11

Lemon Balm

meadowsweet

12

Meadowsweet

Mugwort

13

Mugwort

Red clover

14

Red clover

Spear mint

15

Spear mint

Sweet cicely

16

Sweet cicely

Bog Myrtle (Sweet Gale)

17

Bog myrtle – Sweet gale

Tansy

18

Tansy

water mint

19

Water mint

White Clover

20

White clover

Wild thyme

21

Wild Thyme

wood sage

22

Wood sage

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